Publications

Ensuring Sustainability for Drug Courts: An Overview of Funding Strategies

The National Drug Court Institute (NDCI) has developed this publication to assist courts in creating a sustainability plan that moves past initial implementation into long-term viability.

 

FTDC Evaluation Final Report by NPC Research

Worcel, S. D., Green, B. L., Furrer, C. J., Burrus, S. W. M., Finigan, M. W. (March 2007). Family Treatment Drug Court Evaluation: Final Report. NPC Research: Portland, OR.

This report presents the findings of a national evaluation of Family Treatment Drug Courts (FTDCs), conducted by NPC Research. The evaluation examined whether court, child welfare, and treatment outcomes differed for families served through FTDCs as compared to families who received traditional child welfare services.

An Overview of the Regional Partnership Grants
This document provides basic information on the RPG programs funded by the U.S. Children's Bureau and the 53 sites that were funded.
In-Depth Technical Assistance Overview
A summary of products that were developed during rounds 1-3 of the In-depth Technical Assistance Program.
10 Element Framework

This ten-element framework is a tool for assessing collaboration across systems, specifically the identification of benchmarks for improving system linkages, which are fundamental to improving outcomes for children and families in the child welfare system affected by substance use disorders.

Parental Substance Use Disorders and Child Maltreatment: Overlap, Gaps and Opportunities

Young, N.K., Boles, S.M., & Otero, C. (2007) Child Maltreatment, Vol. 12, No. 2.

Provides a summary of the available data on the number of children in Child Welfare Services who are affected by their parents’ substance abuse or dependence; including the number of infants born each year with prenatal substance exposure.


Targeted Grants to Increase the Well-Being of, and to Improve the Permanency Outcomes for, Children Affected by Methamphetamine or Other Substance Abuse: First Annual Report to Congress
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Administration for Children and Families
Administration on Children, Youth and Families

Children’s Bureau

 

On September 28, 2006, President Bush signed into law landmark legislation, the Child and Family Services Improvement Act of 2006 (P.L. 109-288). The legislation was designed to improve the lives of abused and neglected children and their families, and includes provisions that specifically address those children who are affected by parental methamphetamine and other substance abuse disorders. The legislation reauthorized the Promoting Safe and Stable Families (PSSF) program through fiscal year (FY) 2011 and amended Section 437 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 629g[f]) to include a new competitive grants program: “Targeted Grants to Increase the Well-Being of, and to Improve the Permanency Outcomes for, Children Affected by Methamphetamine or Other Substance Abuse.”

This Report summarizes the activities and support efforts of the 53 regional partnerships grants funded at $40 million in accordance with Section 437 of the Social Security Act, as amended by the Child and Family Services Improvement Act of 2006. Annual grant awards totaled $32.5 million for FY 2007 and are supported by a $7.5 million technical assistance contract.

Family Drug Court Training and Technical Assistance Needs Assessment

This project is supported by Award No. 2009-DC-BX-K069 awarded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office of Justice Programs.

 
Using four different methods of collecting information about the Training and Technical Assistance (TTA) needs of Family Drug Courts (FDCs), this needs assessment found widespread interest in and need for TTA among a diverse group of both new and established FDCs. The needs assessment revealed specific areas of content on which FDCs want help, as well as specific means of providing TTA that are responsive to FDCs’ stages of development and constraints on their travel and networking.
Drug Testing in Child Welfare: Practice and Policy Considerations

The purpose of this paper is to guide child welfare agency policymakers in developing practice and policy protocols regarding the use of drug testing in child welfare practice. This guidance describes the practice and policy issues that policymakers must address to include drug testing in the comprehensive assessment and monitoring that child welfare agencies provide.

Published by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2010. HHS Pub. No. (SMA) 10-4556

This publication may be downloaded or ordered at www.samhsa.gov/shin. Or call SAMHSA’s Health Information Network at 1-877-SAMHSA-7 (1-877-726-4727) (English and Espanol). In addition, this publication can be ordered from the Child Welfare Information Gateway at 1-800-394-3366.

Substance Abuse Specialists in Child Welfare Agencies and Dependency Courts Considerations for Program Designers and Evaluators

This paper focuses on one particular model of collaboration, the placing of substance abuse specialists in either child welfare offices or dependency courts. The purpose of co-locating substance abuse specialists is to ensure that parents are assessed as quickly as possible, to improve parent engagement and retention in treatment, to streamline entry into treatment, and to provide consultation to child welfare and dependency court workers. In addition to briefly describing substance abuse specialist programs and their various components, this paper includes findings from eight qualitative interviews of programs that place substance abuse specialists in child welfare offices or dependency courts.

Publisher: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2010. HHS Pub. No. (SMA) 10-4557

This publication may be downloaded or ordered at http://www.samhsa.gov/shin. Or, please call SAMHSA’s Health Information Network at 1-877-SAMHSA-7 (1-877-726-4727) (English and Español).  In addition, this publication can be ordered from the Child Welfare Information Gateway at 1-800-394-3366.